Coaches

Mike Sullivan
Offensive Coordinator

Biography

Mike Sullivan is in his second season as the Giants’ offensive coordinator, and in the third year of his second stint on the team’s coaching staff. In 2015, Sullivan was the team’s quarterbacks coach. He previously spent eight seasons (2004-11) with the Giants, the first six coaching the team’s wide receivers, and the final two as the quarterbacks coach. During that time, the Giants won Super Bowls XLII and XLVI.
Mike Sullivan is in his second season as the Giants’ offensive coordinator, and in the third year of his second stint on the team’s coaching staff. In 2015, Sullivan was the team’s quarterbacks coach. He previously spent eight seasons (2004-11) with the Giants, the first six coaching the team’s wide receivers, and the final two as the quarterbacks coach. During that time, the Giants won Super Bowls XLII and XLVI.

Sullivan was also the Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ offensive coordinator in 2012-13. He spent the 2014 season as a consultant.

In 2016, outstanding performances by several of Sullivan’s players helped the Giants finish 11-5 and earn their first postseason berth in five years.

Eli Manning completed 377 of 598 passes (63.0 percent) for 4,017 yards, 26 touchdowns, 16 interceptions, and a passer rating of 86.0. Manning exceeded 4,000 passing yards for the third consecutive season, and the sixth time in his career. His 63.0 completion percentage was slightly less than his career-best of 63.1, set in 2014.

Odell Beckham, Jr. finished with 101 catches, the third-highest total in the NFL and the second-highest total in Giants’ history, behind Steve Smith’s 107 receptions in 2009. Beckham’s 1,367 receiving yards were also third in the league, the second-highest total of his career, and the third-highest in Giants history. Beckham had 10 touchdown receptions, which placed him fifth in the NFL (two receivers had 14 and two had 12).

Rookie Sterling Shepard, the Giants’ second-round draft choice in 2016, finished second on the team with 65 catches for 683 yards and eight touchdowns. He caught at least two passes in every game except the victory in Cleveland on Nov. 27. Shepard’s 65 receptions placed him second among NFL rookies behind New Orleans’ Michael Thomas, and were the third-highest total by a rookie in Giants history.

In 2015, Sullivan’s first season as the Giants’ quarterbacks coach since 2011, Manning had one of his finest statistical seasons, completing 387 of 618 passes (62.6 percent) for 4,432 yards, 35 touchdowns and 14 interceptions. Manning’s 618 pass attempts and 387 completions were both franchise records. His 4,432 yards were the second-highest total in Giants history. Manning’s 35 touchdown passes were a career-high, and left him one shy of the franchise record set by Hall of Famer Y.A. Tittle in 1963.

Manning’s 93.6 passer rating was also a career-high. His previous best was 93.1 in 2009.

Sullivan began his two-year stint as Tampa Bay’s offensive coordinator in 2012. That season, the Buccaneers set franchise records with 5,820 total yards and 389 points. Their offense ranked ninth in the NFL with an average of 363.8 yards a game. That Tampa Bay team was 10th in passing yardage (248.9 a game) and 15th in rushing yardage (114.8). Quarterback Josh Freeman set franchise records with 4,065 passing yards and 27 touchdown passes, and running back Doug Martin was selected to the Pro Bowl after setting a team rookie rushing record with 1,454 yards.

Sullivan was the Giants’ quarterbacks coach in 2010-11. In those two seasons, Manning completed 61.9 percent of his passes for 8,935 yards, 60 touchdowns, 41 interceptions and a passer rating of 89.2. He threw a then-career best 31 touchdown passes in 2010 and for a career-high 4,933 yards the following season, when the Giants won their second Super Bowl with Manning as quarterback. In 2011, Manning set an NFL record with 15 fourth-quarter touchdown passes.

Sullivan coached the Giants’ wide receivers from 2004-09. In the last of those six seasons, the team’s wide receivers caught 236 passes. Smith shattered the franchise record with 107 catches and was the first Giants wideout to play in the Pro Bowl in 41 years. Smith’s receptions accounted for 1,220 yards and seven touchdowns. Mario Manningham contributed 57 catches and Hakeem Nicks had 47 and six scores in an exceptional rookie season.

In 2008, Smith led the Giants with 57 receptions. Domenik Hixon, who had one career reception entering the season, had a team-high 596 receiving yards on 43 catches. Amani Toomer was second on the team with 48 receptions in his final Giants season. In four seasons under Sullivan’s tutelage, Plaxico Burress had 344 catches, 3,681 receiving yards, and caught 33 touchdown passes.

David Tyree, another of Sullivan’s players, made one of the greatest plays in Super Bowl history when he improbably secured a Manning pass against his helmet for a 32-yard gain on the Giants’ game-winning drive in Super Bowl XLII.

Sullivan was the Jacksonville Jaguars’ offensive assistant in 2003 after spending the previous season as Jacksonville’s defensive quality control coach under Tom Coughlin. He was the only member of Coughlin’s coaching staff retained by the Jaguars in 2003.

Sullivan joined the Jaguars after nine years coaching on the collegiate level. He began his career at Humboldt State University in 1993. He also coached at Army (1995-96 and 1999-2000), Youngstown State University (1997-98) and Ohio University (2001). In 1997, Youngstown State won the Division1-AA national championship under Jim Tressel, who later won a title at Ohio State. At Ohio University, Sullivan coached the defensive backs and tutored the kick blocking units on special teams.

Sullivan was a defensive back at Army, where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1989. He also has a master’s degree from Humboldt State. Sullivan is a graduate of the U.S. Army Airborne, Ranger and Air Assault schools.

During his first stint with the Giants, Sullivan earned his Blue Belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

Sullivan and his wife, Julie, have two daughters, Carmen Enriqueta and Hope Carolyn. Sullivan was born in Santa Maria, Calif.

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