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Giants RB depth on showcase vs. Eagles

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Number 44, 35, 22 or 33, they're all the same jerseys to Chris Snee and the offensive line.

With Ahmad Bradshaw's return to practice on Wednesday, a variety of combinations and dosages in the backfield opened up, especially given Andre Brown's recent performance. And whether it's one or two backs sharing the load – or possibly even three as Tom Coughlin has done before – Snee is more concerned with the defender in front of him than the teammate running behind. 

"I couldn't tell you if I knew who was behind when I'm up there blocking," the right guard said. "So we're fortunate enough to have depth in the backfield and guys who are very good. But as far as me having a preference or knowing who's behind me when I'm up to block, I don't."

Boosted by Brown's 113 yards in Week 3, the Giants are averaging 100.3 yards per game in 2012. That's right around the 103.0 yards the Philadelphia defense is giving up each week.

Bradshaw hopes to continue the Giants' upward climb in rushing average along with Brown, rookie David Wilson and Da'Rel Scott, who was active against the Panthers for the first time this season.

More the merrier, says Brown.

"That would be nice," Brown said of having multiple backs contributing. "All I can do is just go out there and prepare. Ahmad is the starter, and there's Dave and Da'Rel; we just go out there and work hard and let everything else fall into place."

Eli Manning welcomes anything that will keep the offense humming along. The Giants are averaging 31.3 points per game (tied with Atlanta for the third-best in the NFL), and Manning enters the week as the only passer with more than 1,000 yards.

"Hopefully, we can have a great combination," Manning said of balancing the run and pass. "We can run the ball well, getting good down and distance. Third and long is such a tough situation to be in against Philadelphia with their great pass rushers. Hopefully, I can open up some play-action, and get our whole offense in a good rhythm. So, we have to do a good job of running the ball, setting the tempo, and slowing down that pass rush."




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