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Jim Cordle connects

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Tom Coughlin. Jim Cordle. James Harrison. One of these is not like the others. However, there is a common strand to be found.

How so? I'm glad you asked. And so is Coughlin.

In a late October, 2008 meeting between the Giants and Steelers in Pittsburgh, Harrison, in the middle of his second of four Pro Bowl campaigns and on his way to another Super Bowl victory, was called in for emergency snapping duties. He took over for Greg Warren, who tore his ACL earlier in the game.

Ahead by two points midway through the fourth quarter, the Steelers lined up for a punt. Harrison then snapped the ball over Mitch Berger's head and out of the back of the end zone, tying the game, 14-14. The Giants went on to win by a touchdown.

"I was nervous about snapping for the first time in a game," Harrison said at the time.

Cordle avoided that experience with a fellow member of the undrafted fraternity on Sunday against the Seattle Seahawks.

Signed off the practice squad less than a week before, yesterday Cordle came in for veteran snapper Zak DeOssie, who was later diagnosed with a concussion.

Cordle successfully snapped for two punts and a late fourth-quarter field goal that gave the Giants a temporary lead.

It didn't go unnoticed.

"That is a young man that should be recognized," Coughlin said during his Monday press conference when asked about Cordle, who also took snaps at guard and center. "The reason that I say that is, a couple of years ago if you remember, when we went over to Pittsburgh, they lost their long snapper. The backup long snapper heaved one over the punter's head. We got a safety out of it. It provided great momentum for us. This kid comes in the game and really made a number of very good snaps, got involved in the coverage. Had to go in and play at the guard spot, at the center spot – did a nice job of coming into a game of that magnitude and maintaining his poise and so on and so forth. I'm glad you mentioned Jimmy Cordle. It would have been nice to be able to talk about him in a winning effort."

Tom Coughlin. Jim Cordle. James Harrison. One of these is not like the others. However, there is a common strand to be found.

How so? I'm glad you asked. And so is Coughlin.

In a late October, 2008 meeting between the Giants and Steelers in Pittsburgh, Harrison, in the middle of his second of four Pro Bowl campaigns and on his way to another Super Bowl victory, was called in for emergency snapping duties. He took over for Greg Warren, who tore his ACL earlier in the game.

Ahead by two points midway through the fourth quarter, the Steelers lined up for a punt. Harrison then snapped the ball over Mitch Berger's head and out of the back of the end zone, tying the game, 14-14. The Giants went on to win by a touchdown.

"I was nervous about snapping for the first time in a game," Harrison said at the time.

Cordle avoided that experience with a fellow member of the undrafted fraternity on Sunday against the Seattle Seahawks.

Signed off the practice squad less than a week before, yesterday Cordle came in for veteran snapper Zak DeOssie, who was later diagnosed with a concussion.

Cordle successfully snapped for two punts and a late fourth-quarter field goal that gave the Giants a temporary lead.

It didn't go unnoticed.

"That is a young man that should be recognized," Coughlin said during his Monday press conference when asked about Cordle, who also took snaps at guard and center. "The reason that I say that is, a couple of years ago if you remember, when we went over to Pittsburgh, they lost their long snapper. The backup long snapper heaved one over the punter's head. We got a safety out of it. It provided great momentum for us. This kid comes in the game and really made a number of very good snaps, got involved in the coverage. Had to go in and play at the guard spot, at the center spot – did a nice job of coming into a game of that magnitude and maintaining his poise and so on and so forth. I'm glad you mentioned Jimmy Cordle. It would have been nice to be able to talk about him in a winning effort."

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